Bruichladdich Islay Barley 2009

Bruichladdich Islay Barley 2009 Claggan, Cruach, Island and Mulindry Farms

This 2009 vintage was distilled from grain grown in 2008 by Gilbie McCormick of Claggan, Hunter Jackson at Cruach, Ian McKerrell of Island and Alastair Torrance from Mulindry. These farms are centrally located on the island, providing a very different terroir to the wild maritime location of our 2007 release from Rockside.

We have a passionate belief in our barley. No mere commodity, it is the essential raw material of single malt whisky from this cereal the most avour-complex spirit in the world is made.


For us it is the living expression of the land that gave birth to it, of the terroir that in uences its growth and of the men who nurtured it. These “uber-provenance” single malt whiskies take us far from the usual territory occupied by commercial distillers. They said it couldn’t be done, but here land and dram have been united once again.

Bruichladdich Islay Barley 2009 is:

—  Unpeated Islay single malt Scotch whisky

—  4th release in Islay Barley exploration series

—  Distilled using 100% Islay barley

—  Multi-farm single vintage

—  Publican & Oxbridge barley varieties

—  American oak cask maturation

—  50% vol. for maximum mouth feel

Bruichladdich whisky is always:

—  Matured entirely on Islay

—  Bottled on site using Islay spring water

—  Non chill filtered

—  Colouring free

Islay Barley 2009

Tasting Notes


TASTE PROFILE — Great structure. Firm, muscular and more complex than expected. Several layers of flavour are melding into a barley sugar and oak mellowed texture while drifting over sweet kiln-dried barley. The senses are singing with joy as it zings over the palate leaving no doubt as to the island of its birth.

MOOD — It is the perfect welcome home dram at the end of a hard day. You have given your best so you are entitled to drink the best. Because you can.

NOSE — The opening notes are of soft, really ripe gooseberries, fresh pineapple and mango. It is harvest time in a global orchard, sweet red apple, plump green grapes and even a hint of peach. It is a brilliant opening leading you further into the garden where you can enjoy the harmonious aromas of carnations, mimosa and mint. Night scented stocks and lilies drift on a mid-summer breeze, continuing through the golden fields of Islay barley. This is a Hebridean journey like no other, but wait, the sweetest vanilla notes are emerging with hints of spicy bourbon and a touch of toasted oak. Dark plums appear with dates and that Oloroso richness that only Jerez casks can provide. I could sit all day nosing this spirit solely by virtue of the aromatics alone. A very special experience.

PALATE — The taste is directed. Malty sweet, cereal, honey, clean and citrus fresh. A stunning example of how trickle distillation using Victorian equipment and 134 years of practice can produce a young spirit that needs not the weight of oak to shine. This sensational succulent young spirit offers candied almonds, hints of toffee apple, nougat wafers, banana, ginger biscuits and sherried sponge. It is a tale of two cities. On the nose the floral aromatics were an Islay welcome to a beautiful marriage of ancient Ozark oak and young Islay barley. The Hebridean halo is gently making its presence felt with a distinctive hint of the marine flavours and character you can only find in a spirit matured on the wild west coast of Islay.

FINISH — Enjoy the invitation of an island’s warmth and the sincerity of its people, its history and its future. You are now one of our family.
Welcome.

MOOD — It is the perfect welcome home dram at the end of a hard day. you have given your best so you are entitled to drink the best. because you can.

Islay Barley 2009

Tasting Notes


TASTE PROFILE — Great structure. Firm, muscular and more complex than expected. Several layers of flavour are melding into a barley sugar and oak mellowed texture while drifting over sweet kiln-dried barley. The senses are singing with joy as it zings over the palate leaving no doubt as to the island of its birth.

MOOD — It is the perfect welcome home dram at the end of a hard day. You have given your best so you are entitled to drink the best. Because you can.

NOSE — The opening notes are of soft, really ripe gooseberries, fresh pineapple and mango. It is harvest time in a global orchard, sweet red apple, plump green grapes and even a hint of peach. It is a brilliant opening leading you further into the garden where you can enjoy the harmonious aromas of carnations, mimosa and mint. Night scented stocks and lilies drift on a mid-summer breeze, continuing through the golden fields of Islay barley. This is a Hebridean journey like no other, but wait, the sweetest vanilla notes are emerging with hints of spicy bourbon and a touch of toasted oak. Dark plums appear with dates and that Oloroso richness that only Jerez casks can provide. I could sit all day nosing this spirit solely by virtue of the aromatics alone. A very special experience.

PALATE — The taste is directed. Malty sweet, cereal, honey, clean and citrus fresh. A stunning example of how trickle distillation using Victorian equipment and 134 years of practice can produce a young spirit that needs not the weight of oak to shine. This sensational succulent young spirit offers candied almonds, hints of toffee apple, nougat wafers, banana, ginger biscuits and sherried sponge. It is a tale of two cities. On the nose the floral aromatics were an Islay welcome to a beautiful marriage of ancient Ozark oak and young Islay barley. The Hebridean halo is gently making its presence felt with a distinctive hint of the marine flavours and character you can only find in a spirit matured on the wild west coast of Islay.

FINISH — Enjoy the invitation of an island’s warmth and the sincerity of its people, its history and its future. You are now one of our family.
Welcome.

MOOD — It is the perfect welcome home dram at the end of a hard day. you have given your best so you are entitled to drink the best. because you can.

This 2009 Islay Barley vintage was distilled from relatively small parcels of grain grown in 2008 by Gilbie McCormick of Claggan, Hunter Jackson at Cruach, Ian McKerrell of Island and Alastair Torrance from Mulindry.


These four farms are grouped centrally on the island. Geologically they are very distinct from the wild western maritime location that provided the grain for our 2007 release from Rockside.

Experience the difference. Terroir matters.

This 2009 Islay Barley vintage was distilled from relatively small parcels of grain grown in 2008 by Gilbie McCormick of Claggan, Hunter Jackson at Cruach, Ian McKerrell of Island and Alastair Torrance from Mulindry.


These four farms are grouped centrally on the island. Geologically they are very distinct from the wild western maritime location that provided the grain for our 2007 release from Rockside.

Experience the difference. Terroir matters.

Barley
Barley

A steadily increasing number of the island’s farmers have risen to the challenge of growing Islay barley since the pioneering days of 2004. Mutually supportive and often sharing equipment and know how, they have faced down the risks posed by weather and wildlife and brought the harvests home. They can be justly proud of their achievements.

Distilled in 2009, the spirit run was muscular and clean while in the glass the mature whisky exhibits the colour of golden hay with the nose and palate to transport you to our Hebridean island home.

The barley varieties planted in 2008 were Publican and Oxbridge, not the highest yielding grains, but highly regarded by the maltsters.

The Hebridean weather varies with each passing year, imparting its unique character on the annual harvest. Every year we create a new vintage, a fresh chapter in the unfolding story of Islay Barley.

Rainfall Variation
MONTHLY AVERAGE RAINFALL ON ISLAY.
2006 & 2008 HARVESTS.
20062008
Temperature Variation
MONTHLY AVERAGE TEMPERATURE ON ISLAY.
2006 & 2008 HARVESTS.
20062008

The wind direction in mid- April determines when the huge ocks of wild geese leave Islay for their Artic breeding grounds allowing the farmers to sow their spring barley

The growth rate of the young crop is determined by temperature and rainfall as the season develops. As the harvest approaches.

We all hope for plenty of late summer sun to ripen the grain. Every day of delay means another dining opportunity for Islay’s abundant wildlife and we all wait anxiously for the conditions that will allow the combines to nally bring the harvest home.

We are steadily collecting the data. Every year increases our knowledge, our understanding of Islay’s terroir. Every farm, every eld can be different. Every barley variety, every decision made by every farmer, produces a different character of mash and introduces subtle nuances to the avours within this fascinating spirit.

Gilbie McCormick

Gilbie McCormick, Claggan Farm, Bridgend

55°45’52.2”N / 6°12’26.9”W

Growing for Bruichladdich since 2007

Gilbie and his family have farmed at beautiful, tree-lined Claggan close to the centre of the island for around 35 years. He has a herd of around 100 beef cows plus 400 ewes including a flock of pedigree Texels. He supplies us with malting barley when his livestock commitments allows him to do so.

Gilbie has now been joined in the family business by his sons Gilbie Jnr. and Andrew. The McCormicks’ also have a contracting company which supports Islay’s whisky industry through the delivery of draff to the farms and enables the environmentally responsible dispersal of pot ale.

Hunter Jackson , Cruach Farm, Bowmore

55°44’38.9”N / 6°15’37.2”W

Growing for Bruichladdich since 2008

Hunter has a smallholding in an elevated inland position not far from the village of Bowmore in the centre of the island.

He has a small ock of pedigree Dorset sheep and also raises “mules” (which are a cross between a Blue- faced Leicester tup and a Scottish Blackface ewe).

Hunter and his wife Carol-Ann additionally run an agricultural merchants and consultancy company on Islay keeping island farmers supplied with feed, seed and fertilizer etc.

Ian McKerrell, Island Farm, Bowmore

55°43’52.4”N / 6°17’11.4”W

Growing for Bruichladdich since 2007

Ian is an Islay farmer who has enthusiastically embraced the opportunity to diversify into growing for Bruichladdich.

He sows malting barley for us on a number of fields around Bridgend and on his own farm which is located in the centre of Islay just south of Bowmore.

When he is not ploughing, sowing and harvesting, Ian somehow finds the time to continue raising beef cattle, and is a familiar face around the island due to his dairy supply business.

Alastair Torrance, Mulindry Farm, Bridgend

55°45’52.6”N / 6°12’26.9”W

Growing for Bruichladdich since 2007

Alastair has been an enthusiastic supporter of the malting barley program at Bruichladdich for a number of years and now sows upwards of 50 acres of his rich, centrally located ground with grain for us.

Although quite elevated, Mulindry enjoys a modicum of shelter from Islay’s winds through the planting of trees.

Alastair currently has a herd of 67 Aberdeen Angus cows and 200 Scottish Blackface sheep.

Bruichladdich Distillery
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